Saturday , January 20th 2018
    Music Review

Super Breaks – Return To The Old School

Product Features:

    BGP's top-selling Super Breaks series returns on the 30th Anniversary of the release of the first hip hop singles. The music captured on those early records - by the Sugarhill Gang and the Fatback Band among others - was the result of a street level culture that had grown…
Price as on: 2018-01-06 11:44:07
10.99  

Product Description

BGP’s top-selling Super Breaks series returns on the 30th Anniversary of the release of the first hip hop singles. The music captured on those early records – by the Sugarhill Gang and the Fatback Band among others – was the result of a street level culture that had grown up in the wasteland of 1970s Bronx that had spread throughout New York’s black communities. While MCs created the vocal hooks based on increasingly complicated rhymes, the musical beat was created by pioneering DJs cutting up old and new funk and soul records in ways that allowed them to play the bits of the records that the crowd responded and went wildest to. Super Breaks – Back To The Old School gathers together some of the hottest tracks from those original block parties.

The compilation is inspired by the likes of DJ Kool Herc, Afrika Bambaatta, Grandmaster Flash and Charlie Chase and is a homage to the early breaks compilations such as Paul Winley’s Super Disco Breaks and Original Breaks and Beats. They spread the message of the top DJs to a wider world of house parties and bedroom DJs by gathering up the most sought-after breaks and making them easily available. The clandestine nature of these releases gave them a glitter that added to the new music’s aura, and Super Breaks hopes to reflect this.

The compilation features many of the biggest cuts such as James Brown’s Give It Up Or Turn It Loose, the fake live version from the Sex Machine album that was the original B-Boy album. We bring records such as Cheryl Lynn’s To Be Real and Captain Sky’s Super Sporm which were virtually contemporary releases when the DJs picked up on them, and mix them with records such as Funkadelic’s Good Old Music or Jimmy Castor’s It’s Just Begun which were rescued from obscurity by the early hip-hop community. We have pulled previously under-acknowledged records such as Freedom’s Get Up and Dance which Grandmaster Flash and the Furious Five used as the basis of their hit Birthday Party. Rock records such as Thin Lizzy’s Johnny The Fox and the Monkees’ Mary Mary show the lengths to which the hunt would go to create a unique sound.